Schlagwort-Archive: Thraupidae

… some colorless colorful birds

I have some free days right now, actually I have five days holiday right now!

So I decided to draw a bit … which, of course, hasn’t been that much successful so far … however, here are two pieces that I have at least already sketched, two members of one of the most colorful bird families at all, the tanagers (Thraupidae).

Indigo Flowerpiercer (Diglossa indigotica)
Green-headed Tanager (Tangara seledon)

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edited: 20.03.2019

Bruner’s Rail

Bruner’s Rail (Cacroenis inornatus Bruner) is a very enigmatic species of rail supposed to have been endemic to the Tuamotu Archipelago, whose name repeatedly appears in listings of extinct birds and other publications. [4]  

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Yet, this species has never existed, but see for yourself.:  

The name first appears in the “Field guide to the birds of French Polynesia” from 1972, obviously the first book about the birds of French Polynesia, and full of errors, some of them bad, others worst. [3]  

The story begins right with the discovery of the Cocos Finch in 1843.: [1][2]  

This bird, which is in all probability a female, is from Bow Island, and is, I believe, the only insessorial form that has been brought from thence. Only a single example was procured, and its principal interest consists in its forming an additional species of a small group of birds inhabiting the Galapagos, to which islands they had hitherto appeared to be peculiar. … 
Bow Island has truly little to boast of in its ornithology, since the only birds seen by us during a residence of six weeks at this Atol coral island were doves, the above new species of Cactornis, plover, a few black and white tern which appear attached to these situations, and herons; and none of these were at all numerous. The Cactornis inornatus was usually noticed about the lowly bushes of Petesia carnea, the succulent fruit of which most probably constitutes its chief food.
”  

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Bow- or La Harpe Island, both are old names for the Hao atoll in the middle of the Tuamotu Archipelago, French Polynesia, and the plant mentioned in the text, Petesia carnea, is now known as Psychotria carnea (G. Forst.) A. C. Sm., a species that is native to Fiji and Tonga, and that has never existed in the Tuamotu Archipelago.  

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The bird is mentioned in the “Field guide to the birds of French Polynesia” [as Cacroenis inornatus] as being confusing and obscure but also as being small, speckled and generally brownish in appearance; it appears in a checklist at the end of the book [this time as Cactornis inornatus] as having been introduced to the Archipelago, which is complete bullsh**!  

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The Cocos Finch is now named as Pinaroloxias inornata (Gould), however, how this finch-like tanager finally ended up as a extinct rail species is still not known to me.  

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[1] John Gould: On nine new birds collected during the voyage of H.M.S. Sulphur. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London 11. 103-107. 1843 
[2] John Edward Gray; John Gould; John Richardson; Richard Brinsley Hinds and others: The zoology of the voyage of H.M.S. Sulphur: under the command of Captain Sir Edward Belcher, during the years 1836-42. London: Smith, Elder 1843-1846 
[3] Phillip L. Bruner; O. G. Dykes: Field guide to the birds of French Polynesia. Bishop Museum Press 1972 
[4] Greg Sherley; Rod Hay: Review of avifauna conservation needs in Polynesia. Bird Conservation Priorities and a Draft Avifauna Conservation Strategy for the Pacific Islands Region 10-17. 1999  

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Cocos Finch (Pinaroloxias inornata), female  

Depiction from: ‚John Edward Gray; John Gould; John Richardson; Richard Brinsley Hinds and others: The zoology of the voyage of H.M.S. Sulphur: under the command of Captain Sir Edward Belcher, during the years 1836-42

(public domain) 

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edited: 26.09.2018

Darwin’s Finches or Galápagos Finches

Here is an updated species list, following “Aves – A Taxonomy in Flux”.:

Beck’s Gray Warbler Finch (Certhidea fusca ssp. becki)
Santa Fe Gray Warbler Finch (Certhidea fusca ssp. bifasciata)
Espanola Gray Warbler Finch (Certhidea fusca ssp. cinerascens)
Gray Warbler Finch (Certhidea fusca ssp. fusca)
San Cristobal Gray Warbler Finch (Certhidea fusca ssp. luteola)
Genovesa Gray Warbler Finch (Certhidea fusca ssp. mentalis)
Ridgway’s Gray Warbler Finch (Certhidea fusca ssp. ridgwayi)

Green Warbler Finch (Certhidea olivacea)

Sharp-beaked Ground-Finch (Geospiza acutirostris)

Large Cactus-Finch (Geospiza conirostris ssp. conirostris)
Darwin’s Large Cactus-Finch (Geospiza conirostris ssp. darwini)

Sharpe’s Ground-Finch (Geospiza difficilis)

Medium Ground-Finch (Geospiza fortis)

Small Ground-Finch (Geospiza fuliginosa)

Mangrove Finch (Geospiza heliobates)

Large Ground-Finch (Geospiza magnirostris)

Woodpecker Finch (Geospiza pallidus ssp. pallidus)
Fernandina Woodpecker Finch (Geospiza pallidus ssp. productus)
San Cristobal Woodpecker Finch (Geospiza pallidus ssp. striatipectus)

Small Tree-Finch (Geospiza parvulus ssp. parvulus)
Salvin’s Small Tree-Finch (Geospiza parvulus ssp. salvini)

Genovesa Cactus-Finch (Geospiza propinqua)

Fernandina Large Tree-Finch (Geospiza psittacula ssp. affinis)
Pinta Large Tree-Finch (Geospiza psittacula ssp. habeli)
Large Tree-Finch (Geospiza psittacula ssp. psittacula)

Medium Tree-Finch (Geospiza pauper)

Vampire Finch (Geospiza septentrionalis)

Pinta Cactus-Finch (Geospiza scandens ssp. abingdoni)
Common Cactus-Finch (Geospiza scandens ssp. intermedia)
Rothschild’s Cactus-Finch (Geospiza scandens ssp. rothschildi)
San Salvador Cactus-Finch (Geospiza scandens ssp. scandens)

Vegetarian Finch (Platyspiza crassirostris)

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As before, I decided to arrange the names simply in alphabetical order, and to exclude the species’ authors (and the Cocos Island Finch (Pinaroloxias inornata (Gould)), which is one of the Darwin’s Finches but does not inhabit the Galápagos Islands).

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References:

[1] Heather L. Farrington; Lucinda P. Lawson; Courtney M. Clark; Kenneth Petren: The evolutionary history of Darwin’s finches: Speciation, gene flow, and introgression in a fragmented landscape. Evolution 68(10): 2932-2944. 2014
[2] Sangeet Lamichhaney; Jonas Berglund; Markus Sällman Almén; Khurram Maqbool; Manfred Grabherr; Alvaro Martinez-Barrio; Marta Promerová; Carl-Johan Rubin; Chao Wang; Neda Zamani; B. Rosemary Grant; Peter R. Grant; Matthew T. Webster; Leif Andersson: Evolution of Darwin’s finches and their beaks revealed by genome sequencing. Nature 518: 371-375. 2015
[3] http://jboyd.net/Taxo/taxo1.html

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edited: 03.12.2016

Darwin’s Finches or Galápagos Finches

… having criticized the “A Guide to the Birds of the Galápagos Islands” for not naming the numerous subspecies of the finches, I will now add here a list of all these subspecies, I have named them, to the best of my knowledge, with common names as well.:

Mangrove Finch (Camarhynchus heliobates)

Woodpecker Finch (Camarhynchus pallidus ssp. pallidus)
Fernandina Woodpecker Finch (Camarhynchus pallidus ssp. productus)
San Cristobal Woodpecker Finch (Camarhynchus pallidus ssp. striatipectus)

Small Tree-Finch (Camarhynchus parvulus ssp. parvulus)
Salvin’s Small Tree-Finch (Camarhynchus parvulus ssp. salvini)

Fernandina Large Tree-Finch (Camarhynchus psittacula ssp. affinis)
Pinta Large Tree-Finch (Camarhynchus psittacula ssp. habeli)
Large Tree-Finch (Camarhynchus psittacula ssp. psittacula)

Medium Tree-Finch (Camarhynchus pauper)

Beck’s Gray Warbler Finch (Certhidea fusca ssp. becki)
Santa Fe Gray Warbler Finch (Certhidea fusca ssp. bifasciata)
Espanola Gray Warbler Finch (Certhidea fusca ssp. cinerascens)
Gray Warbler Finch (Certhidea fusca ssp. fusca)
San Cristobal Gray Warbler Finch (Certhidea fusca ssp. luteola)
Genovesa Gray Warbler Finch (Certhidea fusca ssp. mentalis)
Ridgway’s Gray Warbler Finch (Certhidea fusca ssp. ridgwayi)

Green Warbler Finch (Certhidea olivacea)

Large Cactus-Finch (Geospiza conirostris ssp. conirostris)
Darwin’s Large Cactus-Finch (Geospiza conirostris ssp. darwini)
Genovesa Large Cactus-Finch (Geospiza conirostris ssp. propinqua)

Fernandina Sharp-beaked Ground-Finch (Geospiza difficilis ssp. debilirostris)
Sharp-beaked Ground-Finch (Geospiza difficilis ssp. difficilis)
Vampire Ground-Finch (Geospiza difficilis ssp. septentrionalis)

Medium Ground-Finch (Geospiza fortis)

Small Ground-Finch (Geospiza fuliginosa)

Large Ground-Finch (Geospiza magnirostris)

Pinta Cactus-Finch (Geospiza scandens ssp. abingdoni)
Common Cactus-Finch (Geospiza scandens ssp. intermedia)
Rothschild’s Cactus-Finch (Geospiza scandens ssp. rothschildi)
San Salvador Cactus-Finch (Geospiza scandens ssp. scandens)

Vegetarian Finch (Platyspiza crassirostris)

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Some of these subspecies may now warrant species status (for example the Vampire Finch or Vampire Ground-Finch), however, I’m not yet fully into that matter … did I mention before that it appears to be quite difficult to get good information about these birds?

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… hm, maybe I was a bit too excessive with the tags ….   😛

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edited: 02.12.2016