Schlagwort-Archive: Eozän

Palaeotodus escampsiensis Mourer-Chauviré

Diese Art stammt aus dem oberen Eozän Europas und ist der älteste bislang bekannte Vertreter seiner Familie, die heute nur noch mit fünf Arten in der Karibik verbreitet ist.

Die eozäne Form erreichte eine Größe von nur etwa 10 cm und ähnelte somit wohl sehr den rezenten Todi-Arten. [1]

mit den Flügelfedern bin ich mal wieder unzufrieden, mal sehen, vielleicht mache ich da noch was dran …

*********************

Quelle:

[1] Gerald Mayr; Norbert Micklich: New specimens of the avian taxa Eurotrochilus (Trochilidae) and Palaeotodus (Todidae) from the early Oligocene of Germany. Paläontologische Zeitschrift 84: 387-395. 2010

*********************

bearbeitet: 04.03.2022

Avian Musings – blog post from January 23, 2019

In his great blog (that I actually – and that’s no lie – look into at least once a week), Paul Cianfaglione writes about many bird-related things, including fine book reviews, very interesting insights into bird anatomy and everything else.

But his latest post is just unbeatable: he did make an extremely close inspection of a bird fossil from Messel that he owns.:

“Messel Bird Fossil offers unique feather preservation, and more” from January 23, 2019

***

I personally have never seen close-ups of a bird fossil that are so razor-sharp and detailed!

And his bird shows features not known in any living bird – at least not all of them together in one bird.:

The beak is very big and hooked like the beak of a bird of prey or a owl, and it appears to have had sensory pits, the body feathers appear somewhat hair-like, the wing coverts are fluffy, also probably somewhat like the feather edges of recent owls, and the primaries have extremely strange appendages not known in that way from any other bird, living or extinct, but somewhat reminding on the wings of a waxwing.

What kind of a bird was that?

Well, I could try to do a reconstruction, should I?

take 1: that is just a doodle, maybe I have more time tomorrow to make a complete drawing

Gosh, this is so exciting!   🙂
take 2
take 3

***

The Avian Musings blog does not longer exist, unfortunately.

*********************

edited: 03.09.2021

A new Messel bird with exceptionally well-preserved feathers!

During the latest digging campaign in the Messel shale, a new bird fossil was found that has unimaginably well-preserved feathers – even by Messel standards, while the bones themselves are rather crumbly.

***

This bird reaches the size of a recent Great Tit (Parus major L.), it apparently had a short and broad beak and anisodactyl feet.

The feathers are exceptionally well-preserved and distinctly colored: the feathers on the head and neck are greyish brown with reddish brown tips; the rump feathers are dark ashy brown; the primary coverts of the wing are straw yellow, the primaries are reddish brown with a purplish hue; the tail feathers (at least 10) are nearly as long as the primaries, they are straw yellow and have a distinct reddish brown and dark brown stripy pattern not unlike as in recent birds of prey.

These are of course not the original colors of that bird, yet the patterns are! [1]

***

The fossil has only just been found, it hasn’t yet been prepared and has not even a collection number, thus there is not much that can be said about it, however, all in all this form reminds me on Hassiavis laticauda Mayr, a member of the family Archaeotrogonidae from the same locality, but it is of course much smaller and has proportionally less stout arm- and leg bones.

*********************

References:

[1] Georgina Jadikovskaal: Fossil of unknown bird species resembling great tit found during dig at UNESCO site. Zenger News July 12, 2021

*********************

… just a quick sketch

*********************

edited: 09.08.2021

Nahmavis grandei Musser & Clarke

Endlich, endlich beschrieben!

Das dazugehörige Fossil ist schon seit etlichen Jahren bekannt und wurde ursprünglich als Angehöriger der ausgestorbenen Familie Salmilidae aus der Ordnung der Seriemaartigen (Cariamaformes) betrachtet.

Des Weiteren konnte man oft lesen, dass es sich um einen flugunfähigen Vogel mit winzigen Stummelflügeln gehandelt haben muss, schließlich kann man diese Flügelchen ja im Foto ganz gut erkennen … nun, nein, kann man eben nicht, was man hier sieht sind einfach nur etwas ‚unglücklich‘ gewachsene Federn; schaut man genau hin findet sich aber nicht die Spur irgendeines Flügelknochens!

Tatsächlich sind die Vordergliedmaßen des Tieres nach dem Tod bzw. während der Verwesung vollständig abhanden gekommen; sämtliche noch vorhandenen restlichen Teile weisen auf einen normal flugfähigen Vogel hin, er wird also zu Lebzeiten ganz normal ausgebildete Flügel besessen haben..

***

Nahmavis grandei, so heißt der Vogel nun, ist ein sehr ursprünglicher Vertreter der Regenpfeiferfamilie (Charadriiformes).

*********************

Referenzen:

[1] Lance Grande: The Lost World of Fossil Lake: Snapshots from Deep Time. University of Chicago Press 2013  
[2] Grace Musser; Julia A. Clarke: An exceptionally preserved specimen from the Green River Formation elucidates complex phenotypic evolution in Gruiformes and Charadriiformes. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. 8:559929. doi: 10.3389/fevo.2020.559929. 2020

*********************

Foto aus: ‚Grace Musser; Julia A. Clarke: An exceptionally preserved specimen from the Green River Formation elucidates complex phenotypic evolution in Gruiformes and Charadriiformes. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. 8:559929. doi: 10.3389/fevo.2020.559929. 2020‘

(under creative commmons license (4.0))
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

*********************

bearbeitet: 26.10.2020

FMNH PA789

This is a small bird from the Eocene of Wyoming, USA, it was only about 10 cm long and is so far known from a complete skeleton with most of the feathers preserved as well.

The bird is not yet described but is apparently currently under study, it may turn out to be related to Morsoravis sedilis Bertelli, Lindow, Dyke & Chiappe, and to belong into a new family, probably named the Morsorornithidae or alike, which then again are perhaps somehow related to the mousebird/parrot/songbird ‘orbit’.

The reconstruction shows it while somewhat stretching its left wing, it was ‘fun’ to draw all this wing feathers, and I probably will do that NEVER EVER AGAIN!!!   😉

*********************

*********************

A little update here: 

This bird is now apparently included into the genus Morsoravis. [2]

*********************

References:

[1] Lance Grande: The Lost World of Fossil Lake: Snapshots from Deep Time. University of Chicago Press 2013
[2] Daniel T. Ksepka; Lance Grande; Gerald Mayr: Oldest finch-beaked birds reveal parallel ecological radiations in the earliest evolution of passerines. Current Evolution 29(4): 657-663. 2019

*********************

edited: 07.12.2019

A kingfisher-like bird from Messel – Quasisyndactylus longibrachis Mayr

This tiny bird is thought to be the ancestor of the kingfishers or of the todies, or of both.

Quasisyndactylus longibrachis was very small, only about 10 cm long, its legs were quite long, very much like in today’s todies (Todidae) and its feet were syndactyl (that means two of the toes, toes 3 and 4, are fused together), like those of all known Coraciiformes showing that it was a member of that order.

The species is known from several specimens, some of which also still harbor their feathering, showing that this species had rather roundish wings and a rather long tail.

*********************

References:

[1] G. Mayr: „Coraciiforme“ und „piciforme“ Kleinvögel aus dem Mittel-Eozän der Grube Messel (Hessen, Deutschland). Courier Forschungsinstitut Senckenberg, Band 205. 1998

*********************

Photo: Ghedoghedo

(under creative commons license (3.0))
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en

*********************

my reconstruction, following a specimen with well preserved feathers; it’s only a sketch so far

*********************

edited: 05.11.2019; 06.11.2019

Perplexicervix microcephalon Mayr

This species was described in 2010, it is known from five or six specimens found in the Messel shale, five of which include cervical vertebrae which again all bear strange small tubercles unknown in any other bird dead or alive.

The bird may or may not be related to the so-called screamers (Anhimidae), it had a quite small head compared to its body and had very large and strong wing bones, thus apparently was good at flying, its feet have short toes which appear to have been somewhat flattened – and my gut feeling tells me that they may have had been webbed ….

*********************

a humble reconstruction, note that I forgot to draw the halluces (big toes) onto the feet

*********************

edited: 07.08.2019

Vanolimicola longihallucis Mayr

This species was described in 2017, it is one of the many birds from the Messel shale, that are somehow related to living ones but on the other hand again … are completely different.  

This one is thought to be related to the Charadriiformes, and it may indeed have been a member of the jacana family (Jacanidae).   

*********************

my reconstruction sketch, which turns out very much jacana-unlike

*********************

BTW: I only recently learned that the age of the Messel shale spans from the upper Early – to the lower Middle Eocene.  

So not every bird from there is from the Middle Eocene.

*********************

edited: 04.08.2019

Eutreptodactylus itaboraiensis Baird & Vickers-Rich

Dieser rätselhafte Vogel aus dem späten Paläozän frühen Eozän Brasiliens ist nur von einem einzigen, zerbrochenen Tarsometatarsus bekannt, der jedoch offenbar den Kuckucken zugeordnet werden kann.  

Ich kann nicht so viel über diesen Vogel sagen, er scheint für eine paläozäne Vogelart ziemlich groß gewesen zu sein, und es könnte tatsächlich ein echter Kuckuck gewesen sein oder es könnte etwas völlig anderes gewesen sein.  

***

Ein kleines (längst überfälliges) update … diese Art wird mittlerweile mit der Familie Gracilitarsidae in Verbindung gebracht.

Der Vogel in meiner neuen Rekonstruktion ist immer noch ungefähr 15 cm lang und ungefähr ein Drittel größer als Gracilitarsus mirabilis Mayr, der einzigen anderen bekannten Art der Familie.

Rekonstruktion

*********************

bearbeitet: 28.07.2019

Fossile Vögel aus dem James Ross-Basin in der Westantarktis

Es dürfte schon aufgefallen sein, dass ich ein bisschen von den Vögeln des Paläozän besessen bin, auch weil wir jede Menge gar nichts über sie wissen, besonders über jene aus dem frühen Paläozän, dem Beginn der „T-Zeit“, der Zeit unmittelbar nach dem K T-Grenze.  

Nun, es gibt eine neue Veröffentlichung, die einen Überblick über die Vögel gibt, die genau zu dieser Zeit existierten, an der K/T-Grenze … auf dem Kontinent der Antarktis, um genauer zu sein, aber auch über diese Zeit hinaus bis zum Oligozän. [1]  

***

Ich habe diese Veröffentlichung noch nicht vollständig gelesen, aber da fast alle Vogelfossilien aus diesem Gebiet auf einzelne Knochen oder manchmal Teilskelette beschränkt sind, wirft es nicht so viel neues Licht auf die vorherigen Aufzeichnungen.

*********************

Quelle:

[1] Carolina Acosta Hospitaleche; Piotr Jadwiszczak; Julia A. Clarke; Marcos Cenizo: The fossil record of birds from the James Ross Basin, West Antarctica. Advances in Polar science 30(3): 250-272. 2019

*********************

bearbeitet: 25.07.2019

Finch-like non-finches

Here we have the two species of finch-like passeriform birds that had been described at the beginning of this year, Eofringillirostrum boudreauxi and Eofringillirostrum parvulum, both from the Eocene, the first from North America, the second, smaller species from Europe.

***

Eofringillirostrum boudreauxi Mayr, Ksepka & Grande

This is the larger of the two known species, reaching about 10 cm in length, it also is the older one, having lived in the Early Eocene about 52 Million years ago in what today is Wyoming, USA.

This is what I call a pre-sketch, or a working sketch, it’s just the very first step in reconstructing a fossil bird, in which this particular species is drawn in a simple side-view, usually smaller than life-size.

Eofringillirostrum parvulum Mayr, Ksepka & Grande

This bird may have reached a length of only about 9 cm, it lived in the Middle Eocene of what today is the State of Hesse in Germany.

I sketched it together with a reconstructed infructescence of Volkeria messelensis Smith, Collinson et al., a plant from the family Cyperaceae that was growing around the Messel lake, and whose seeds may indeed have been eaten by this presumably seed-eating bird.

*********************

edited: 05-03.2019

Pumiliornis tessellatus Mayr

Pumiliornis means as much as “dwarf bird”, and with that, all has been said.

***

No, not so fast ….

The genus/species was described in 1999 and is, to my knowledge, so far known from three skeletal finds, of which one even contains the remains of its last meal, namely pollen.

All in all, Pumiliornis tessellatus resembled today’s sunbirds (Nectariniidae) or the sunbird-asitys (Eurylaimidae) in being very small and having an elongated beak. Its beak, however, was quite unlike those of the members of the beforementioned two families, it resembled the beak of a plover (Charadriidae), especially its narial opening (nose hole), which was rather slit-like and not round.

Pumiliornis was apparently a flower-visitor that fed on nectar and pollen (as is known from the content of the gut of one specimen), however, it may not have been specialized to that diet and may also have taken insects and other small invertebrates.

The bird was small, very small, in my reconstruction it reaches a length of only 7,5 cm, this size, however, is of course depending on the length of its tail feathers, which unfortunately are not preserved in any of the known specimens. I’ve reconstructed the bird with a rather short tail, which may some day turn out to be completely wrong, who knows.

The feet corresponded to the typical scheme of recent passerine birds, i.e. they have three toes pointed forward and one towards the back. However, the feet appear to have been facultative or semi-zygodactyl, which in turn means, in simple terms, the first toe usually pointed forwards, but could be held backward when needed.

***

The genus/species originally could not be assigned to any living bird family, not even an order, but is now known to belong to the extended Passeriformes-orbit, which in addition to the passerine birds also includes the falcons (Falconiformes) and the parrots (Psittaciformes). It is now known to have been a member of the extinct family Psittacopedidae, that apparently also contains other unusual genera like MorsoravisPsittacopes and the recently described, very interesting Eofringillirostrum and probably others too.

***

Finally, it should be mentioned that this bird was not a dwarf spoonbill, as claimed by a certain person.   😉

*********************

References:

[1] Gerald Mayr: Pumiliornis tessellatus n. gen. n. sp., a new enigmatic bird from the Middle Eocene of Grube Messel (Hessen, Germany). Courier Forschungsinstitut Senckenberg. 216: 75-83. 1999
[2] Daniel T. Ksepka; Lance Grande; Gerald Mayr: Oldest finch-beaked birds reveal parallel ecological radiations in the earliest evolution of Passerines. Current Biology 29: 1-7. 2019

*********************

edited: 08.02.2019

Psittacopes lepidus Mayr & Daniels

When this tiny creature was first described it was thought to represent some parent form of the parrot order, however, it later [1] was reinvestigated and is now placed near the Passeriformes … near them, not among or in between them!  

My reconstruction is life sized, the bird here is nearly 12 cm long, the feathers, however, are not known, so are completely speculative!  

*********************  

References:

[1] Gerald Mayr: A reassessment of Eocene parrotlike fossils indicates a previously undetected radiation of zygodactyl stem group representatives of passerines (Passeriformes). Zoologica Scripta 44(6): 587–602. 2015  

*********************  

edited: 17.09.2018

Geheimnisvolle Vögel: Teil 1.: Die Familie Sylphornithidae

Hier möchte ich einmal eine Art Fortsetzungs“roman“ beginnen, der sich mit geheimnisvollen, kaum bekannten, rätselhaften Vogelformen beschäftigen soll.

***

Die Familie Sylphornithidae wurde im Jahr 1988 für die Art Sylphornis bretouensis Mourer-Chauviré erstellt, die aus dem oberen Eozän Frankreichs stammt. Weitere Gattungen/Arten wurden später hinzugefügt. [1][2][3][4]

Die Familie umfasst sehr kleine, singvogelähnliche Vögelchen, gehört allerdings zur Ordnung der Spechtvögel (Piciformes) und ist innerhalb dieser Ordnung wahrscheinlich am nächsten mit den rezenten Glanzvögeln (Galbulidae) verwandt. Die Sylphornithidae sind hier nur eine von wahrscheinlich mehreren Familien innerhalb dieser Ordnung, die im Paläogen [Paläozän, Eozän, Oligozän] die Nischen besetzten, die heute von Singvögeln eingenommen werden. [4]

***

Die bislang bekannten Vertreter der Sylphornithidae weisen einen semi-zygodactylen Fussbau auf, das bedeutet, die äußere Zehe konnte je nach Bedarf nach vorn oder nach hinten gedreht werden.

***

Die folgenden Gattungen/Arten werden [von einigen Autoren] zur Familie Sylphornithidae gestellt.:

Palaegithalus cuvieri (Gervais): 1852 als Singvogel beschrieben, Oberes Eozän, Frankreich

Sylphornis bretouensis Mourer-Chauviré: 1988, Oberes Eozän, Frankreich [1]

Eutreptodactylus itaboraiensis Baird & Vickers-Rich: 1997, Oberes Paleozän, Brasilien; diese Art wurde ursprünglich der Familie der Kuckucke (Cuculidae) zugeordnet [2]

Oligosylphe mourerchauvireae Mayr & Smith: 2002, Unteres Oligozän, Belgien [3]

*********************

Palaegithalus cuvieri; Typusexemplar, zu unvollständig um genauer untersucht werden zu können

Georges Cuvier: Recherches sur les ossemens fossiles de quadrupèdes : où l’on rétablit les caractères de plusieurs espèces d’animaux que les révolutions du globe paroissent avoir détruites. Paris: Deterville 1812

(public domain)
Palaegithalus cuvieri, diese beiden Exemplare scheinen heute nicht mehr zu existieren

Darstellungen aus: Alphonse Milne-Edwards: Recherches anatomiques et paléontologiques pour servir à l’histoire des oiseaux fossiles de la France. Paris: Victor Masson 1867-1871

(public domain)

***

Es bleibt noch zu erwähnen, dass die Welt im Paläogen einerseits recht ähnlich ausgesehen haben mag wie heutzutage, dass aber viele bekannte Rollen von anderen „Darstellern“ eingenommen wurden, nicht nur bei den Säugern sondern auch bei den Vögeln. Echte Singvögel gab es zu dieser Zeit auf der heutigen Nordhalbkugel noch nicht oder zumindest noch kaum, ihre Nischen wurden von vollkommen anderen Vögeln eingenommen, darunter Verwandte der Hopfe, der Mausvögel, der Papageien oder der Spechtvögel.

Echte Singvögel, die nachweißlich in Australien entstanden, wanderten erst im Laufe des Paläogens ein und konnten sich schließlich zum Ende dieses Zeitalters wirklich etablieren und zu der unfassbaren Anzahl an Arten weiterentwickeln, die wir heute kennen.

*********************

Referenzen:

[1] C. Mourer-Chauviré: Le gisement du Bretou (Phosphorites du Quercy, Tarn-et-Garonne, France) et sa faune des vertebres de l’Eocene superieur; 2. Oiseaux. [Le Bretou locality (Quercy Phosphorites, Tarn-et-Garonne, France) and its late Eocene vertebrate fauna; 2. Birds.]. Palaeontographica Abteilung A 205(1-6): 29-50. 1988
[2] Robert F. Baird; Patricia Vickers-Rich: Eutreptodactylus itaboraiensis gen. et sp. nov., an early cuckoo (Aves: Cuculidae) from the Late Paleocene of Brazil. Alcheringa: An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology 21(2): 123-127. 1997
[3] G. Mayr; Richard Smith: Avian remains from the lowermost Oligocene of Hoogbutsel (Belgium). Bulletin de l’Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belqique, Sciences de la Terre 72: 139-150. 2004
[4] Gerald Mayr: The phylogenetic relationships of the Tertiary Primoscenidae and Sylphornithidae and the sister taxon of crown group piciform birds. Journal of Ornithology 145(3): 188-198. 2004

*********************

geändert: 26.05.2018

Morsoravis sedilis Bertelli, Lindow, Dyke & Chiappe

This bird was described in 2010, it was then thought to be somehow related to the Charadriiformes respectively to the Charadriiformes “orbit”, later it was assumed to belong in some kind of relationship with other likewise “well-known” birds like Eocuculus cherpinae (Chandler), or Pumiliornis tessellatus Mayr.

The reconstruction shows a tiny bird, some 12 cm long, with a sharp-pointed beak and a quite long neck, such a bird would have needed long tail feathers to stabilize its body – so I just gave it a long tail, cause the feathers are not preserved in the Fur Formation birds.

***

So here is how all begins, some cut-out bone drawings put together, lines made with a pencil etc..:

some puzzling

The final result is a quite life-like bird, maybe I got enough time to make a real painting, with colors and so on ….:

not charadriform-alike at all

*********************

References:

[1] Sara Bertelli; Bent K. Lindow; Gareth J. Dyke; Luis M. Chiappe: A well-preserved ‘charadriform-like’ fossil bird from the Early Eocene Fur Formation of Denmark. Paleontology 53(3): 507-531. 2010
[2] Gerald Mayr: On the osteology and phylogenetic affinitis of Morsoravis sedilis (Aves) from the early Eocene Fur Formation of Denmark. Bulletin of the Geological Society of Denmark 59: 23-35. 2011

*********************

edited: 22.01.2018

‘Neanis’ kistneri (Feduccia)

Neaniskistneri, der Gattungsname ist in Anführungszeichen geschrieben da der Vogel nicht zur Gattung Neanis gehört, zu der ansonsten eine einzige Art, Neanis schucherti Shufeldt, gehört, ist vermutlich ein Vertreter der Ordnung Piciformes und mag mit der Familie Galbulidae verwandt sein. 

Die Art ist bisher von einem einzigen, fast vollständigen Skelett bekannt, und wie so viele eozäne Vögel war sie ein Zwerg.  

Dies ist natürlich nur eine Skizze

*********************

bearbeitet: 19.11.2017

Songzia spp.

This genus currently contains two species, which mainly differ by their size, Songzia acutunguis Wang et al. and the slightly smaller Songzia heidangkouensis Hou.

These two species have much in common with the recent species of the rail family, yet may not be related to them, but may be closer to the extinct Messel ‘Rails’, the Messelornithidae, which themselves may or may not be members of the Gruiformes.

~~~

The two Songzia ‘Rails’ are small, sparrow-sized birds, in life they probably inhabited the margins of lakes and other swampy areas.

The picture is just a sketch.

*********************

Feather impressions are not known to my knowledge, however, I thought it would be a good idea to give the bird somewhat elongated tail feathers, since the feather impressions in some messelornithid fossils show that these birds had very long tail feathers.

*********************

Resources:

[1] Min Wang; Gerald Mayr; Jiangyong Zhang; Zhonghe Zhou: Two new skeletons of the enigmatic, rail-like avian taxon Songzia Hou, 1990 (Songziidae) from the early Eocene of China. Alcheringa: An Australian Journal of Palaeontology 36: 487-499. 2012

*********************

edited: 08.01.2017

Antarktischer Moa?

Die Ratiten (Laufvögel wie Emu, Kasuar, Kiwi, Nandu, Strauß) sind heutzutage aus verschiedenen Teilen der Welt bekannt, aber es ist nur schwer vorstellbar, dass sie einst auch in der Antarktis vorgekommen sein sollen.

Und doch ist dem so.

Die erste Spur, die auf die ehemalige Existenz solcher Vögel hindeutete waren Fußspuren, die ursprünglich der Familie der Terrorvögel (Phorusrhacidae) zugeordnet wurden; die nächste Spur tauchte im Jahr 1994 in Form eines Fragments eines Tarsometatarsus auf, und schließlich im Jahr 2012 kam noch ein Fragment eines Oberkiefer-/-schnabelknochens hinzu, der ziemlich sicher tatiten Ursprungs gewesen sein dürfte.

Basierend aus diesem Oberkieferfragment habe ich den Kopf (und Hals) dieses antarktischen Ratiten rekonstruiert.:

… sieht sehr Moa-ähnlich aus.   🙂  

*********************

Referenzen:

[1] Claudia P. Tambussi; Jorge I. Noriega; Andrzej Gaździcki; Andrzej Tatur; Marcelo A. Reguero; Sergio F. Vizcaino: Ratite bird from the Paleogene La Meseta Formation, Seymour Island, Antarctica. Polish Polar Research 15(1-2): 15-20. 1994
[2] Marcos Cenizo: Review of the putative Phorusrhacidae from the Cretaceous and Paleogene of Antarctica: new records of ratites and pelagornithid birds. Polish Polar Research 33(3): 239-258. 2012

*********************

bearbeitet: 13.06.2016